Grateful.










Photos By What The Doost 

WHAT I’M WEARING:
PANTS: Mandeep Nagi | KAFTAN: Ahilaya | SCARF: Indian Chikankari by House of JMD | TOTE: Novica handmade by Indian Artisans | SUNGLASSES: Quay | SANDALS: Denim Slides


GRATEFUL. 


Mercury is out of retrograde (FINALLY) and my world is slowly starting to fall back into order. New challenges, opportunities, and a bit of uncertainty are all swirling in the air. The past few weeks have been some of the most challenges situations I have had to face in years. Learning to be strong for the people we love, learning to not let it break us, and learning how to heal ourselves are all part of the process. One thing that has helped me, and can help you face life’s challenges= GRATITUDE. Being grateful is a powerful tool, it helps your mind, body, and soul. It’s that simple. Be Grateful (period). This causes you to focus on the good, even though it might seem like life is constantly throwing the bad in our faces. 

Did you know there are LEGIT scientifical facts that prove the benefits of gratitude? Gratitude improves physical health. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression. Grateful people sleep better. Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer. Gratitude increases mental strength. For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma.  A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War Veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.  A 2003 study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11.  Gratitude improves psychological health. Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.
…Thats facts y’all 

I read a great article this past weekend on Mindful that gave three easy tips to practice gratitude I wanted to share them in my own way: 

1) Tap into 5 good things
Think of five things that you’re grateful for, and do this on a daily basis. You can do this when you’re going to sleep or waking up — or you can do it right now. You might say, “That’s something I’ve heard of before.” I’ll challenge you to say, when’s the last time you put that into a regular practice in your life? Explore this practice and notice the positive impact it can have for you. 

Today I wrote down what I was grateful for this morning:
  1. The amazing friends in my life who help me get through the good and bad days 
  2. My STRENGTH (physical strength and mental strength) 
  3. Meditation 
I challenge you to do this everyday, it’s amazing how this can help you see a new perspective. 

2) Get inspired
Think of at least one person right now who you are appreciative or grateful for having in your life, as an inspiration in some way. Settle into, “What is it about this person that I am actually appreciative for?” Allow yourself to feel that. Talk a walk and notice the beautiful nature around you. Go to an art gallery and get lost in the color. Watch a movie or documentary that will help your mind think differently. 

3) Grow grateful feelings
Text, email, message, make a date, or call that person right now and share with them what it is about them that you’re appreciative of, or let them know that you’re just appreciative for having them in your life. Each day I make it a point to text the people I love and wish them a good day. I don’t have time to physically call everyone but I take 2 minutes to text them and let them know I am thinking about them and I care. I try to keep in touch with good friends and people that mean a lot to me, even if it’s once a week to let them know I’m rooting for them or they are in my heart.  I started noticing that people now do this back for me, and it truly makes me feel good and fulfilled. I also stopped making an effort to the people who do not add value or emotional support to my life, boundaries and distance (Im grateful for that too). 


We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude.